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Category Archives: Self-Publishing

Reality of Self-Publishing

Many years ago,  I found myself driving to Miami at 95 mph with Hunter Thompson in the passenger seat putting away a bottle of Pinch, 12 iced bottles of Heineken, and a fair amount of Peruvian Marching Powder. I had been told to place guests for this program in locations where they would feel comfortable so I had ordered a 6 man crew to set Hunter up in a bar. Ten minutes before we hit air, I was told by New York that it looked too much like a bar, so we changed everything. As soon as Gonzo had done his live shot, I ordered a limo to take him wherever he wanted to go, carefully cleaned my rental car, and disappeared.  Mr. Thompson took the limo to Atlanta at a cost of $500 where someone else, I guess, wasn’t a “gutless weasel” and would restock his supply of nose candy.

    The point is that, for 40 years, I worked in network TV news where our mantra was “failure is death.” No matter how strange, expensive, or difficult; there was always a way to get the job done.

    When I wrote my first novel, I played the game—wrote perfect letters to agents, waited 2 years for my agent to find a publisher, waited 18 months to be published, wrote the sequel two years ahead of schedule, and created a massive social media marketing machine. Six weeks after my book “Courier” was published, the publisher, Exhibit A, was wiped out in a drive-by acquisition.

    On New Years Day 2015, I did a self-evaluation:  my name was gone from my agent’s website (which I took as a sign,) the company that now owned my book was planning to mulch the paperbacks, my eBook had simply vanished, two PR companies had provided very little at great expense, social media was less expensive but equally worthless, and I was staring into the abyss of the “self-published author.”

    Oh, and I didn’t have a “day job.”

    So, I became a publisher.

    Learning was a familiar process from my TV days, one I used to describe as “figuring out the dimensions of a room by running around blindfolded and smashing into the walls.” I got a Kindle version of “Courier” up in 3 hours and replaced it with a readable version two days later. I bartered t-shirts for the rights to the cover art from the wonderful Brit who’d done the original. I slugged away at IngramSpark’s format requirements with the help of a friend from high school and had a paperback up in two weeks. I completed and published a fantasy/satire titled “Day of the Dragonking” by April Fools Day (which seemed appropriate,) and rewrote, re-edited and published “Warrior,” the sequel to Courier, on July first.

    What I do best is write, so I’m writing as fast as I can: editing a wonderful non-fiction book by a Japanese film cameraman who was the best news shooter in Vietnam and have both a private eye series set in 1930’s Manila and a YA dystopian in the works.

    I learned that most of what I knew about marketing was wrong. Advertising seldom works, mechanically plugging books on Twitter, Facebook, and blogs doesn’t work, and radio and online podcasts are fun but that’s about it. What works is getting readers to learn about an author, like the author, and tell their friends about the author so that means book giveaways, honest reviews, and real blogs. The Starred Review that PW gave my second book was fantastic because it not only bolstered my personal sense of worth as a writer but also raised our visibility in the eyes of other reviewers. On the other hand, I still need to learn the equivalent of an entire MBA about distribution and wholesale marketing.

   To my surprise, my British PR guru has discovered that Westerns are a consistent seller so we have quite a few of those and are very excited about A. R. Arrington, our new-fangled old-fashioned success story.  Along with A.R., we have a group of promising new authors whose work ranges from children’s books to Texas Romance, a global team of freelancers who can do just about anything, and Great Expectations of going into the black by New Year’s Day 2016.

Lessons Learned:

–Don’t spend money you don’t have unless you really have to—like getting a great cover, for instance.

–Hire a bookkeeper. FAST. Fiverr has great people from all over the world

–Listen to readers and don’t mistake your own preferences for the desires of the market.

–Pay your subcontractors quickly and completely—the same goes for your authors’ royalties.

–Realize and remember that publishing right now is like William Goldman’s description of Hollywood,

“Nobody knows nothing.” 

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A Preview of “On the Frontlines of the Television War” by Tony Hirashiki

Hirashiki 1

Time: 10am

Date: April 27, 1966

Place: ABC News bureau on the 6th floor of the Caravelle Hotel in Saigon.

“How do you do, sir? I’d like to introduce myself. My name is Yasutsune Hirashiki—just arrived from Japan.”

Well, my initial greeting went very well. I shouldn’t have been surprised–after all I’d been practicing it for days.

The man with the mustache gave me a smile and a handshake. His name was Jack O’Grady, the bureau chief for ABC News Saigon. He wasn’t all that tall, just a bit taller than an average Japanese.

“Welcome to Vietnam! New York told me you were coming. They said you were a damn good cameraman.”

He went on to tell me that he’d screened the demo reel of film clips that I’d sent to New York weeks ago and that he was struck by the creativeness of my photography.

That sounded good.

“I’m ready to work, sir. When shall I start?” I said.

“Well, this week is very quiet, so why don’t you check with us next week?” He replied.

What? I hadn’t expected that. Did he just say that I didn’t have a job this week but I might have a job next week. But only if it was busy?

I was sure he was mistaken. I had a letter from Jack Bush, the executive in New York who hired camera crews around the world for ABC. He had very clearly said that I should quit my job at a Japanese local TV station and fly to Vietnam where a job was waiting for me.

This is what I’d wanted for years. I quit the news cameraman job where I’d spent the past ten years, packed up everything I owned, and came to Saigon to join ABC News–one of the mighty American News Networks.

Clearly, this O’Grady fellow hadn’t gotten the message.

I hadn’t practiced this speech but I believe my English was very clear. “Mr. O’ Grady, I was hired by New York as Saigon bureau cameraman. According to New York’s instructions, I quit my job at a Japanese TV station, and come here to work.” I said.

Mr. O’Grady patiently listened to my terrible English and said, “Show me the letter.”

I gave it to him. He read it, smiled, and said, “Look at this line.”

He then ran his finger along the line of incomprehensible English words as he carefully read them to me. “It says that you will have a chance if you go to Saigon but there the word ‘hired’ isn’t in here. We will give you a chance. Come back and check next week. If it’s busy and we need a cameraman, we’ll send you on an assignment and you’ll have a chance to show us your work.”

I was in shock. He was right! Being Japanese, I had translated the letter with a dictionary and only paid attention to what I thought was the important parts of the letter.

Quit. Go to Saigon. Have a chance.

3 Pillars of Selling More Books Online | Digital Book World

The 3 Pillars Of Selling More Books

by Beth Bacon

Strategies for creating best sellers take time.

Strategies for creating best sellers take time.

In the digital book marketplace, individual authors fight in the same ring with legacy publishers. The big publishers have an advantage: the power of their reputations grabs the notice of readers. Indie authors and publishers struggle for any attention at all. The “little guys” can overcome this disadvantage if they build their careers around three strategic pillars: brand curation, relationship marketing, and, finally, creating quality books.

Pillar 1: Brand Curation

Successful authors don’t just write books. They build their careers. Bestselling authors don’t become a household name on the sales of just one book. (Okay, there’s Harper Lee, but To Kill A Mockingbird is an epic exception). Successful writers become known within their niche. They build series, work in a single genre, and develop a clear, focused brand.

Know your audience

Authors who sell a lot of books know their readers. Elmore Leonard recently passed away at age 87. In its eulogy of the late, great crime writer, the business radio show Marketplace ran an old interview with Leonard  in which a reporter suggested he should write about Wall Street. After all, he joked, the place is full of criminals. “But I don’t write that,” Leonard replied without even pausing, “My people don’t have stock. I think it’s the most boring thing in the world.” Leonard knew his audience and wrote for them specifically.

Center it all on your website

A major part of curating a great career is running an effective web site. High-selling authors treat their online presence like it’s the hub of the universe—because, for their fans, it is. Take a look at John Green’s Tumblr page. http://fishingboatproceeds.tumblr.com/ Green is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars, Looking for Alaska, and other YA novels. His posts are fun, educational, and often have nothing at all to do with his books. But they all have everything to do with the worldview of his teen audience. Green uses YouTube and Twitter and a bunch of other social media vehicles as avidly as the  teenagers who read his books. But his single Tumblr web site connects to them all. It’s his hub, the one solid place his fans can track the many balls that John Green juggles.

Be yourself

Finally, to have a great career as a writer, don’t be trendy, be yourself. Erotica is big right now. But if you are more comfortable writing PG romances, don’t add titillating scenes just to jump on the racy bandwagon. Stick with your voice, be true to your own sensibilities. Readers are very canny at picking up inauthenticity.

For the Rest of the Story – Click Here

via 3 Pillars of Selling More Books Online | Digital Book World.

Do Indie Authors Still Suck? Or Did They Once Suck and Now Don’t? Or Did They Never Suck?

[Terry: OK, we have an impassioned and occasionally vulgar attack and a reasoned and polite — if deadly–response. So, I decided, as someone who once considered himself a journalist, to combine them into one.

FIRST.  An impassioned anonymous writer who has issued a obscene and illustrated jeremiad against independent authors.
SECOND: Misha Burnett, an old friend of this blog who responds reasonably but firmly–and wields a damn good literary stiletto.
THIRD: Because I wasn’t really a journalist, I only worked in television news, I’m going to include a POLL so we can trivialize the conversation and generally enjoy ourselves.
Hey!  I was extremely well-trained in the art and craft of crappy TV!]

Why Indie Authors Still Suck

Posted on August 10, 2013 by Grammar Nazi Panzer General

1

I’ve come here today to talk to you about Indie Authors.  Yes, that’s right, Indie Authors.

I contemplated answering a question about indie authors, until I realized that I’ve gotten the same question over and fucking OVER about the indie market. I figured it deserved its own, shiny little blog post.

So let’s address the main question here: Is the Indie Market really that bad?  I mean are they really?

Yes.  They really, really are.

There are exceptions to every rule, and I’ll address that in a minute, but for now let me just say, the Indie Market is shit.  It’s a little pile of shit, wrapped up in shit, to make a shit burrito covered in shit sauce.

In the Indie World, you can find the drudges of the literary market.  The unedited, untalented, unresearched drivel that has been rejected by every publishing house this side of the universe– and with good reason. But instead of putting the book down, or setting it on fire, the sorry excuse for a writer has turned to the indie market for validation.

The author has taken the 10,945th attempt to write the next Twilight and thrown it to the rabid, uncaring, undiscerning market of women clamoring for their next idiotic, pathetic female, and well-chiseled male, and they don’t care if anything is spelled correctly.  They don’t care if there isn’t a coherent plot.  They don’t care if the author writing the book has never taken a basic literary course.  And somehow, that validates their writing against all of the professional rejection they’ve received.

On the other side of that you’ll find authors who have never tried the traditional literary market.  I’m going to go out on a limb here and pull this percentage out of my ass…

Ahhhhhhh.  96%.  I believe about 96% of those who have never tried the traditional market don’t because they know they’re going to get rejected.  Their book is nothing but glorified fanfiction, and somehow they’ve decided that indie publishing is the way to go, and have the gall to ask hard-working human beings to pay them for that drivel.

There is a time and a place for that shit, my dears.  And it’s called Livejournal.  It’s the place where pathetic, lonely, vampire obsessed writers go to get their fix.

For the Rest Click HERE  Why Indie Authors Still Suck | So You Think You’re An Author.

mishaburnett

An open letter to a frightened man

This is in response to “Why Indie Authors Still Suck” on So You Think You’re An Author by someone who calls himself “anonnymouse13″.

Now, I won’t address the obscenity, profanity, and random personal attacks liberally sprinkled through this post.  Seventh grade was a lot of years ago for me, and that stuff stopped either shocking or amusing me years ago.

Looking at the forty percent or so of the post that actually says something, he has written a rather passionate defense of traditional publishing.  Passionate, yes, reasonable, not so much.

Basically, he has one good point to make. Books require editing.  That happens to be quite true.  It is true for Indie authors and it is true for traditionally published authors.  Quite frankly, I don’t know anyone who doesn’t agree with that.  So I’ll just admit the obvious and agree with him.

Books require editing.

However, from that fact he draws the completely erroneous assumption that because books require editing it therefore follows that authors must be published by traditional publishing houses or “they suck”.

In the first place, traditional publishing houses do not have a monopoly on editors.  There are a great many excellent freelancers who work on a per-job basis for indie authors.  Many of these freelancers have experience working at the traditional publishing houses and either left to pursue freelance careers or were let go in one of the innumerable restructurings that the publishing business seems to require.

In the second place, a freelance editor works for the author and does what the author wants done.  A staff editor works for a publishing house, and does what the publishing house wants, usually for less money than a freelancer, and often under an enforced schedule that allows for little more than spellchecking.  The days when a traditional publishing house could afford to give personalized attention to a new author are long gone.

The same goes for book designers and cover artists.  Traditional publishing houses view these as assembly line functions–you say it’s science fiction?  Here’s your picture of a rocket ship.  Fantasy?  Here’s your elf girl in a chain-mail bikini. Next!

Anonnymouse13′s main argument–that traditional publishing houses turn out a higher quality product than an independent author working with freelancers–is simply not supportable.  And that’s his best argument.

He goes on to say that he believes that the majority of authors who choose to self-publish do so because they know that traditional publishers wouldn’t accept their books.  He is probably right about that.  I can only speak for myself, but I am sure that no traditional publishing house would be interested in Catskinner’s Book or Cannibal Hearts. I rather doubt that The Fauxpocalypse Project could find a home at a traditional publisher.

Why?  Because I have books that don’t have either rocket ships or elf-girls in chain-mail bikinis.  I have morally ambiguous characters, sexually ambiguous characters, I play games with the narrative structure, I don’t wrap up all the loose ends in a nice neat package.  I like to make my readers think and question their own preconceptions.  Worst of all, I write books that can’t be described as “Just Like The Last Bestseller We Sold You! (And The One Before That…)” 

To be fair, you also need to click here to see the rest of Misha’s skewering.

via An open letter to a frightened man | mishaburnett.

[Vote as often as you like for as many choices as you like.  Trust me, this is as accurate as any other online poll.]

A #mustread for all aspiring #writers » How To Know if Social Media is Working For You

The B.A.R.F. Score: How To Know if Social Media is Working For You

[snip]

 

abacus


Put simply, this is how you judge the value of anyone you are connected to on social media:

X = (A*B)+(C*D)/E

Whereas:
A = number of Twitter followers you have
B = size of your email list
C = # of Facebook fans
D = # of daily repins on Pinterest
E = the likelihood that you can introduce me to Seth Godin or Malcolm Gladwell

X here, represents your value, or your “Base Author Recommendation Factor” or BARF score for short. In other words: exactly how valuable are you as a friend. What do you do with this X number once you have it? Oh, so many things, all of which are shielded from authors by the “powers that be” in publishing.

 

For more secrets of your BARF Score, click on Writer Unboxed » The B.A.R.F. Score: How To Know if Social Media is Working For You.

Writer Unboxed » Are You Building An Audience Of Writers, Not Readers?

Writer's Block 1

Writer’s Block 1 (Photo credit: OkayCityNate)

Far too many writers build an audience of the WRONG people. As a writer, you craft a work that is meaningful to you, and you wonder how you will connect it to the world. So you begin engaging with people online and off, telling them about your writing.And guess what? Guess who is MOST interested in this journey you are on? Readers? Nope. Oftentimes, it is other writers.So we do what feels validating and welcoming: we join amazing communities such as WriterUnboxed.com. We forge relationships, we grow our platforms with people who want you to succeed as a writer.But therein lies the problem.

In other words: YES, engage with other writers. But don’t stop there.

 

Every single week, learn more about who your readers may be. Engage with them in tiny ways online. And off. Learn what it is about your writing that cuts to the heart of why your ideal audience readers. Discover what it is about one of your stories or books that jumped out at people.

How do you begin engaging with readers? Just a few ideas:

  • Read. Read books similar to yours, if possible. Engage as a fan would. Leave reviews online, recommend books, consider who else is doing the same.
  • Understand what other books are like yours, especially those published in the past 5 years. Where are they shelved in bookstores, how are they displayed, what comes up in “People who who bought this also bought…” in Amazon?
  • What is the language that other readers used again and again in reviews on Amazon, Goodreads, LibraryThing, and other sites?
  • Who are these readers – specifically? See their Goodreads profiles, understand what else they read.
  • Talk to readers. On social channels, follow them, comment on their updates, and learn about them. Engage as a fan of similar work, not an author trying to promote your own books.
  • Develop a group of beta readers.
  • Everywhere you go, ask the person standing next to you: “what do you like to read?” Then ask why.
  • Join book clubs, attend events at bookstores and libraries – do anything possible to chat with other readers about why they read. Study the expressions on their face, the cadence of their voice as they talk about reading.
  • Talk more about other people’s books than your own.
  • Create profiles of your ideal readers. Create lists of where you can find them online and off. Go there. Often.
  • Craft messaging that gets readers interested in your writing. Test this again and again, both in person, and in digital channels. Revise constantly.

via Writer Unboxed » Are You Building An Audience Of Writers, Not Readers?.

Top 10 Best-Selling Books in Self-Publishing for April 2013 | Self Publishing News For Self-Publishing Authors

Top 10 Best-Selling Books in Self-Publishing for April 2013

27 May

Outskirts Press, the fastest-growing full-service self-publishing and book marketing company, is pleased to announce its top ten best-selling titles for April 2013, according to combined data from Ingram Book Wholesalers and Outskirts Press Direct via http://outskirtspress.com/bookstore. These authors have likely created a solid book marketing strategy and put it into motion either by themselves or with the help of a Personal Marketing Assistant.

In alphabetical order, the top ten best-selling books in self-publishing during the month of April 2013 were:

via Top 10 Best-Selling Books in Self-Publishing for April 2013 | Self Publishing News For Self-Publishing Authors.










Congratulations to our best-selling authors for the month of April 2013!

Bowker Launches SelfPublishedAuthor.com | Digital Book World

English: Bowker Vale Looking south from Bowker...

English: Bowker Vale Looking south from Bowker Vale station as a car departs towards Victoria. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After months of adding services for self-publishing authors to its ISBN platform, Bowker has taken the next step in offering information and services for independent authors.

The book industry data and services provider has launched SelfPublishedAuthor.com, an information, advice and resources portal with information on self-publishing books and ebooks.

In February, Bowker partnered with DCL and Vook to offer its customers who purchased ISBN numbers ebook production and distribution options. In May, Bowker teamed up with book publicity firm Smith Publicity to offer public relations services.

The new site seems to be a culmination of Bowker’s strategy to enter the self-publishing market. SelfPublishedAuthor.com features blog posts with advice for authors as well as a self-publishing checklist, which includes links to Bowker-owned services, like ISBN purchasing, as well as Bowker-affiliated services, like ebook distribution from Vook.

[Press Release]

Bowker Launches SelfPublishedAuthor.com

Web resource connects indie publishers with advice and resources tailored to their needs

May 20, 2013 (New Providence, NJ) – ProQuest affiliate Bowker® has launched a new web resource to guide independent authors to success. SelfPublishedAuthor.com offers tools, advice, and resources for navigating the publishing process, serving a burgeoning market of authors who are bypassing the traditional publishing route to take total control of their book projects.

“Bowker has tracked extraordinary growth in the number of self-published works over the past five years,” said Beat Barblan, Bowker director of identifier services. “There are thousands of authors who need access to advice, guidance and resources. SelfPublishedAuthor.com is designed to be their partner, helping them bring their books to market in the most effective way.”

Bowker, the official ISBN agency for the US and its territories, is uniquely suited to work with independent authors. Its MyIdentifiers® website, where publishers can purchase ISBNs, is often the first step in the publishing process, and has grown to include connections to a wide variety of publishing-related services. Now, SelfPublishedAuthor.com complements it with industry advice and perspective, marketing tools, referrals to partners who can help independent publishers and a calendar of events specifically for self-published authors.

“We’re committed to being a comprehensive, practical and valuable resource that helps publishers build connections with the right partners and the right audiences,” said Mr. Barblan.

To learn more visit http://www.selfpublishedauthor.com.

via Bowker Launches SelfPublishedAuthor.com | Digital Book World.

How To Use Auto Responder Emails to Boost Your Blogging Efforts : @ProBlogger

I thought emails were a waste of time and that they are ignored, but then I learned how to do it right and watched the numbers flip.

https://i2.wp.com/www.problogger.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/distribution-process.png

After you published a great post and pushed it through your social network, the third step is to leverage your email list too. This is where the auto-responders can help you gain new subscribers while you’re busy writing your next blog post.

The majority of email marketing services are the same. I prefer Constant Contact or Mobilizemail’s new email feature. Following the steps below you can use almost any email marketing service to set up an auto responder system in just three days.

via How To Use Auto Responder Emails to Boost Your Blogging Efforts : @ProBlogger.

From the desk of Phylis Johnson: Proofreading, self-publishing, tips

Interrobang big

Interrobang big (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Every writer on CompletelyNovel has the option to order proof copies of their work at cost price so that they can thoroughly check their book before it goes public. We’re seeing many of our authors do this and it’s something we are really keen to encourage!

If you are self-publishing then proofreading your manuscript is a really challenging task and you’ll kick yourself if you find a mistake after you have told everyone about the book.

No matter how many times you have read through your work it’s amazing how often errors can sneak through to the final stages. The problem is that you are so familiar with the text that you see what you think you have written rather than what you actually wrote. For this reason, at the very least it’s good to ask a few friends to help you proofread.

Don’t forget to carefully proofread the cover, copyright and title pages as well as any indices, tables of contents and dedications. We have noticed that mistakes in these areas happen surprisingly often!

So, short of hiring a professional proofreader, what else can you do to make sure that your book is as close to perfect as you can possibly make it?

Here are 10 tips for proofreading your book:

Put your writing aside for a while. This allows you to see things with fresh eyes that are more likely to spot errors.

Look at your weaknesses. Do you regularly misspell or repeat words? Do you make particular grammar or punctuation errors? If you are aware of these weaknesses you can take extra care to search or spot them.

Read your work out loud. If you read aloud, your ear might catch errors that your eye may have missed. You could also use text-to-speech software.

Try proofreading backwards! To spot typographical errors, read your work from the end to the beginning, either word by word, sentence by sentence or paragraph by paragraph. This disconnects your mind from the content and helps you focus on the text. Particularly useful for checking the cover.

Keep style and usage handbooks readily available and use them! Our favourite is the Guardian Style Guide.

Watch out for those pesky contractions, apostrophes and homonyms.

Run the spell check to catch any obvious errors. However, don’t rely on this alone as it can’t always be completely accurate.

Highlight all punctuation marks so that you can evaluate each one for accuracy.

Proofread a printed version of your work. People read differently on screen and on paper, so print out a copy of your writing, either on paper or into a book using CompletelyNovel.

Get someone else to proofread it. A fresh pair of eyes is a great way to spot errors.

via Proofreading, self-publishing, tips.

phylis

The Real Costs of Self-Publishing a Book | Mediashift | PBS

A printing press in Kabul, Afghanistan

 

Get Carla King’s new e-book on self-publishing!
Self-Publishing Boot Camp Guide for Authors: Step-by-Step to Self-Publishing Success

At every writers conference or self-publishing panel the question that almost always inevitably comes up is: “How much will self-publishing really cost me?”

Because the book publishing industry is one of the last industries to go digital, it’s going through a quick transition. As a result of this shift, authors no longer need to go through the traditional gatekeepers to publish high-quality books and are instead moving toward self-publishing. Launching a book is like launching a startup. Putting together a quality book involves not just writing it, but getting it edited, then formatted, designing a cover, and having a marketing strategy around it.

Below, I break down the costs of how much professional services will cost you for a high-quality book.

(For the purposes of calculation we’ll assume you have a manuscript that is 70,000 words.)

1. Developmental editing

Once you’ve written your book, a developmental editor is important. Many authors think they don’t need an editor. Everyone needs at least some type of editor. Not having an editor is like not QA’ing a software product or not testing a drug before it goes out into the marketplace. An editor will evaluate and critique your manuscript, suggest and provide revisions, and shape it into a smooth, workable piece. They’ll look at the big picture and make sure everything flows and is consistent.

Costs:

1-5 manuscript pages/hour for a manuscript page that’s 250 words, according to the Editorial Freelancers Association.

$45-65/hour based on the experience of the editor

70,000/250 = 280 pages

280 pages /5 pages per hour = 56 hours

Low end is 56 x $45 = $2,520

High end is = $18,200

More at  The Real Costs of Self-Publishing a Book | Mediashift | PBS.

Diaries, the original social media: How our obsession with documenting (and sharing) our own lives is nothing new » Nieman Journalism Lab

Barnaby

If you’ve ever kept a diary, chances are you probably considered that document private. As in,

Luke @StereotypeLuke

MOM I’VE TOLD YOU A MILLION TIMES MY DIARY IS PRIVATE SO DON’T FUCKING READ IT AGAIN PS THANKS FOR CLEANING MY ROOM IT LOOKS NICE

But that wasn’t always the case when it came to personal journals. At least, not according to Lee Humphreys, a communications and media researcher at Cornell.

Humphreys led a conversation this week with Microsoft Research’s Social Media Collective on historicizing social media practices. Humphreys argues that, through journals and diaries, people have been recounting their daily activities and reflecting on them for much longer than Twitter and other social media platforms have been around.

But through her research, Humphreys found that it’s only been in the last hundred years that journalling has come to be considered a private practice. In the late 19th century, she says visiting friends and relatives would gather together and read each others diaries as a way of keeping up to date and sharing their lives. Journals were also kept in early American towns to mark and record important events: weddings, births, deaths and other events of community-wide importance.

“You don’t get a real sense of personal, individual self until the end of the 19th century,” Humphreys told the Cornell Chronicle in 2010, “so it makes perfect sense that diaries or journals prior to that time were much more social in nature.”

via Diaries, the original social media: How our obsession with documenting (and sharing) our own lives is nothing new » Nieman Journalism Lab.

How to Get Your First 1,000 Email Subscribers When Nobody Knows You : @ProBlogger

 

Watching and Blogging

Watching and Blogging (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a guest contribution by Marya Jan, blogging coach from Writing Happiness.

What’s the biggest excuse you hear from people who are not getting the results they want from their blogging?

“I don’t know anyone online.”

Not ‘my content might not be good’. Not ‘I don’t a clear idea of what I am doing’. Not ‘I know it takes time and I am learning everything I can’.

None of that. It’s always because they don’t have any connections with the big shots.

Allow me to put up my hand and say this … I have over 1,000 subscribers (multiple times over actually) and I have done this under 18 months of blogging AND without having connections with any famous people.

via How to Get Your First 1,000 Email Subscribers When Nobody Knows You : @ProBlogger.

sweetheart rewrite COMBINE 2

An Open Letter to Indie Authors on the Importance of Marketing | Novel Ideas

Collection of Marteting books

Collection of Marteting books (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

an open letter penned to all writers from one of the bestselling independently published authors of today. Lloyd Tackitt!

lloydtackittFellow Independent Authors: Promoting our books is half the battle. The other half of course is writing a book. If you’re like me, you have barely enough time available to write. I work a day job and have a long commute leaving me precious few hours to write. Writing must come first or there is nothing to promote.

After the book is published we’re now faced with the dismal (but painfully real) fact that our new book is just one of hundreds of thousands of new books. If we don’t do something to make it stand out, significant sales don’t happen. How do we get the readers to notice our book? We are forced to become involved in marketing, and that is time consuming – which means we’re not writing the next book. It’s a downward spiral.

It’s downward because I don’t understand marketing, and frankly I would rather be writing anyday. I love to write – I don’t love marketing, I don’t even like marketing. So I figured I would just keep writing and worry about marketing some other day.

via An Open Letter to Indie Authors on the Importance of Marketing | Novel Ideas.

sweetheart rewrite COMBINE 2

Do You Know These Time Saving Blogging Tips? : @ProBlogger

I’m still stuck on the question of “Why Blog?” but I guess, if you have the Urge to Blog, you might as well know the quickest way to do it. (aside from mechanized theft, that is. Or is that simply called ‘aggregation’?)

Over the last few days we’ve been tackling the problem of ‘not enough time to blog’ that many bloggers struggle with. I started by sharing 7 tips for busy bloggers on how to find time to blog and then had 14 of my blogging friends share a little about their blogging routines.

When I asked these 14 bloggers about their routines I also asked if they had any tips for other busy bloggers. I’m glad I did because collectively they give some great insight below.

via Do You Know These Time Saving Blogging Tips? : @ProBlogger.

6 Easy Steps To Book Your Author Blog Tour | Self-Publish 101

There are many ways to kick off your promotional blog tour. You can:

Hire a publicist to nab spots on popular blogs.

Hire an established and reputable book blog tour company (NOTE: There are unscrupulous companies that claim to get gigs for their clients on dozens of blogs, many of which lack a meaningful audience or are owned by the companies themselves).

Set up blogging dates yourself.

via 6 Easy Steps To Book Your Author Blog Tour | Self-Publish 101.

Kindle Direct Publishing launches beta of cover creation tool | TomAlanBrosz

One of the hardest parts of self-publishing is generating a good cover, either for paper books or digital ones. Places like Createspace and Lulu, among others, already have “cover wizards.”

via Kindle Direct Publishing launches beta of cover creation tool | TomAlanBrosz.

Yeah, and Createspace is owned by Amazon.  Do they think their covers suck?

Hugh Howey: Self-publishing is the future — and great for writers – Salon.com

Contrary to recent reports, I am not the story of self-publishing.

The story of self-publishing is Jan Strnad, a 62-year-old educator hoping to retire in four years. To do so is going to require supplemental income, which he is currently earning from his self-published novels. In 2012, Jan made $11,406.31 from his work. That’s more than double what he made from the same book in the six months it was available from Kensington, a major publisher. He has since released a second work and now makes around $2,000 a month, even though you’ve never heard of him.

via Hugh Howey: Self-publishing is the future — and great for writers – Salon.com.

Self-Publishing Is The Blah Blah And Floo-Dee-Doo And Poop Noise « terribleminds: chuck wendig

Forgive me if I sound a little exasperated.

Hugh Howey wrote a thing at Salon and it’s a very interesting article and you should go read it. It is, in my probably-not-that-humble opinion, a fascinating mix of artistic wisdom and business fantasy where anecdotal evidence once more becomes artisanal data and we are told that because you can meet 100 very successful self-published authors that is now officially the way to go and oh, by the way, it’s totally the future of all publishing ever.

I distrust fortune-tellers, to be honest.

Mostly because it’s made-up horseshit.

via Self-Publishing Is The Blah Blah And Floo-Dee-Doo And Poop Noise « terribleminds: chuck wendig.

When Self-Publishing Is Just Screaming Into The Void « terribleminds: chuck wendig

SNSFW but quite funny (and sadly, true)

First, you can’t just be a writer. Self-publishing is… gasp, not the same thing as writing. This fellow took his unpublished work, hit the publish button, and then leaned back and waited for the trap-door to open above his head and spill a fluttering rain of sweet, sweet cash on his naked body. Yeah, whoa, buddy, you actually have to commit more work than that.

via When Self-Publishing Is Just Screaming Into The Void « terribleminds: chuck wendig.

Why You Must Create a Compelling Book Description | change it up editing

Why You Must Create a Compelling Book Description | change it up editing.

Copyediting or Proofreading: 5 Steps to Determine What You Need

Change It Up Editing

ProofreadingIn the past few weeks I’ve received queries from several writers about my editing services. “How much do you charge to edit a 110,000 word novel?” and “What will it cost to copyedit my nonfiction book. It’s about 300 pages.”

These seem like perfectly reasonable questions, don’t they? The problem for me, as an editor, is that they are too vague. Editing is a very broad term that covers every function from development through line editing to proofreading—soup to nuts in editorial services, so to speak.

When you’re on a budget (and really, who isn’t?), it’s important to plan for your upcoming expenses. Your editorial budget should not be an exception! All writers who publish—traditionally or through self-publishing—are going to have to buy some level of editorial services. When you plan to seek an agent or query publishers directly, you should use at least one professional editor before you submit…

View original post 1,034 more words

Should you Self-Publish?

A very good analysis of a very common dilemma

Self-Publish 101

There is a certain stigma that comes with self-publishing, the term being branded as vanity publishing. However, a deeper understanding of how publishing works can help you know what truly is in store for you in terms of self-publishing.
Many aspiring authors who have grown tired of trying to get an agent, let alone get their book published. With so many authors, a mountain of manuscripts and limited shelf-space, these authors have taken things into their own hands, going en-route self-publishing.
According to Bowker, the agency that assigns ISBNs and publishes the Books in Print database, self-published books have outnumbered traditional titles in production last year.
Self-publishing, just like traditional publishing, is not for everyone. However, it can be right for you. If you find yourself in any of these situations, then self-publishing just might work to your advantage:
• You know that your book has real potential but…

View original post 193 more words

Lev Raphael: Planning a Blog Tour? Think Twice.

Blog tours are all the rage right now for indie and traditionally-published authors. My advice: think it through, and then talk to other people who’ve done them, and think it through again.

I’d heard mixed reports about them, and decided to try one myself. Now I wish I hadn’t wasted my time.

via Lev Raphael: Planning a Blog Tour? Think Twice..

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Dunia Timbangan,081280780615,081291999252,0216016259,Harga Timbangan,Harga Timbangan Duduk,Harga Timbangan Digital,Harga Timbangan Analitik,Harga Timbangan Manual,Harga Timbangan Gantung,Harga Timbangan Duduk Digital,Harga Timbangan Duduk Manual,Harga Timbangan Lantai,Harga Timbangan Mekanik,Harga Timbangan Gantung Manual,Harga Timbangan Gantung Jarum,Harga Timbangan Buah Digital,Harga Timbangan Neraca Analitik,Harga Timbangan Elektrik,Harga Timbangan Digital Gram,Harga Timbangan Gram,Timbangan Duduk,Timbnagan Manual,Timbangan Duduk Manual,Timbangan Analitik,Timbangan Laundry,Timbangan Mekanik,Timbangan Salter,Timbangan Nagata,Timbangan Cahaya Adil,Timbangan Quattro,Timbangan Sapi,Timbangan Ternak,Timbangan Adam,Analitycal Balnce,Moisture Balance,Timbangan Sn Timah,Timbangan Oc Timah,Timbangan Chq,Timbangan Matrix,Timbangan Acis,Timbangan Lantai,Timbangan Gantung,Timbangan Gantung Jarum,Timbangan Gantung Manual,Jual Timbangan,Timbangan Barang Digital,Timbangan Pemancingan,Timbangan Galatama,Timbangan Obat,Timbangan Neraca Analitik,Timbangan Lantai Digital,Timbangan Camry,Harga Timbangan Laundry,Harga Timbangan Beras,Harga Bandul Timbangan,Anak Timbangan,Batu Timbangan,Timbangan Daging,Timbangan Buah,Timbangan Sayur,Timbangan Barang,Timbangan Balance,Timbangan Floor Scale,Timbangan Counting,Timbangan Anti Air,Timbangan Water Proof,Timbangan Jarum,Timbangan Duduk Jarum

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